Determinants of Personality

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What are the Determinants of Personality?

The major determinants of a personality are:

Biological

Hereditary:

Personality may be hereditary, that is, transmitted from parents to their children through genetics. Research done on animals has suggested this theory; however, there is inconclusive proof whether this theory may work with humans. It is more likely that only human temperament is transmitted through genetics.

Brain:

Psychologists find it difficult to empirically relate brain physiology to personality. However, from the electrical stimulation of the brain, they have realized that a better understanding of human personality may come from the study of the brain.

Physical Features:

Physical characteristics of a person have a tremendous influence on his/her personality. Physical characteristics may include height, weight, attractiveness, skin color, gender, etc.

Cultural

While culture may be considered to play an influential role in the development of one's personality, psychologists have not found conclusive proof of this concept. Nevertheless, cultural influences on one's personality may he vast. A person within a culture is expected to behave in a certain way that is acceptable to the whole community.

Familial & Situational

This process is a bit complex and is dependent upon various processes. Social processes such as our interaction with our parents during childhood may have a great influence on our personalities. When we interacted with our parents, we picked up their behavior. In face, there is empirical evidence that the environment parents create at home shapes their child's personality. For example, a child brought up in a violent home may grow up to be aggressive.

Furthermore, there are various personality theories that study the development of personality based on family and social factors. These theories are the intrapsychic theory, type theories, trait theories, social learning theories, and self-theory. While all these theories differ in their fundamental principles, they all show that the development of personality depends upon social constructs created by society.

Additional Readings:

1. Human Relations Movement according to Fred Luthans
2. Definition of Organization Behavior
3. Fundamental Concepts of Organizational Behavior
4. Unconscious Behavior and Sigmund Freud
5. Mechanics of Defense Mechanisms
6. Content and Process, and Abraham Maslow's Need-Hierarchy Theory
7. Theory of motivation by Herzberg
8. Definition of Morale
9. Ego States
10. Determinants of Personality
11. Definition of Perception
12. Attitude, Belief, and Ideology
13. Stress and State of Exhaustion
14. Leadership and Leadership Styles
15. Path-Goal Leadership

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